Acts of the Apostles 18:22-28

The reading is from Acts of the Apostles 18:22-28

IN THOSE DAYS, when Paul had landed at Caesarea, he went up and greeted the church, and then went down to Antioch. After spending some time there he departed and went from place to place through the region of Galatia and Phrygia, strengthening all the disciples. Now a Jew named Apollos, a native of Alexandria, came to Ephesos. He was an eloquent man, well versed in the scriptures. He had been instructed in the way of the Lord; and being fervent in the spirit, he spoke and taught accurately the things concerning Jesus, though he knew only the baptism of John. He began to speak boldly in the synagogue; but when Priscilla and Aquila heard him, they took him and expounded to him the way of God more accurately. And when he wished to cross to Achaia, the brethren encouraged him, and wrote to the disciples to receive him. When he arrived, he greatly helped those who through grace had believed, for he powerfully confuted the Jews in public, showing by the scriptures that the Christ was Jesus.

 

Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary on Acts 18:24-28 Apollos taught in the gospel of Christ, as far as John’s ministry would carry him, and no further. We cannot but think he had heard of Christ’s death and resurrection, but he was not informed as to the mystery of them. Though he had not the miraculous gifts of the Spirit, as the apostles, he made use of the gifts he had. The dispensation of the Spirit, whatever the measure of it may be, is given to every man to profit withal. He was a lively, affectionate preacher; fervent in spirit. He was full of zeal for the glory of God and the salvation of precious souls. Here was a complete man of God, thoroughly furnished for his work. Aquila and Priscilla encouraged his ministry, by attendance upon it. They did not despise Apollos themselves, or undervalue him to others; but considered the disadvantages he had laboured under. And having themselves got knowledge in the truths of the gospel by their long intercourse with Paul, they told what they knew to him. Young scholars may gain a great deal by converse with old Christians. Those who do believe through grace, yet still need help. As long as they are in this world, there are remainders of unbelief, and something lacking in their faith to be perfected, and the work of faith to be fulfilled. If the Jews were convinced that Jesus is Christ, even their own law would teach them to hear him. The business of ministers is to preach Christ. Not only to preach the truth, but to prove and defend it, with meekness, yet with power.
Reflection:

Matthew Henry’s comment; “Young scholars may gain a great deal by converse with old Christians.” Speaks volumes, in today’s world there are many emerging philosophies that are not in total agreement with traditional thought; can we really throw out the window two thousand years of understanding? As I study scripture I like to reference—among other sources—Matthew Henry’s commentaries. Henry lived approximately three centuries ago and viewed scripture from the reformationist’s point of view; Protestant but yet traditional. Instead of adopting an interpretation technique that is largely your way, that is to say disregarding what older Christians saw as sound interpretation in favor of interpretations that justify your chosen lifestyle or sin, wouldn’t it be spiritually wiser to consult historical references? To—as Henry said—“…converse with old(er) Christians?”

 

Say this prayer or one of your own

 

Our Father, which art in heaven,

Hallowed be thy Name.

Thy Kingdom come.

Thy will be done in earth,

As it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread.

And forgive us our trespasses,

As we forgive them that trespass against us.

And lead us not into temptation,

But deliver us from evil.

For thine is the kingdom,

 

The power, and the glory,

 

For ever and ever.

 

Amen.

As always;

Go out into the world in peace;

have courage; hold on to what is good;

return no one evil for evil;

strengthen the fainthearted;

support the weak; help the suffering;

honor everyone; love and serve God;

rejoicing in the power of the Holy Spirit!

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